Speakers

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Jane Withka
Director & Collaboration Lead
Pfizer Worldwide R&D

Over 25 years of experience in the pharmaceutical industry in support of macromolecular NMR and biophysical applications within a structural biology and biophysics group. Initiated fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) at Pfizer and responsible for portfolio management and initiatives for fragment library design. Leadership role in the integration of alternative hit ID strategies including, FBDD, ASMS and DEL technologies. Laboratory head of NMR and biophysics group within Structure and Molecular Sciences and responsible for the implementation and integration of lead identification, binding and functional characterization and optimization methods into Pfizer’s discovery environment. Recently transitioned to director and collaboration lead to facilitate identification of new target classes and modalities for targeting with small molecules. Received Ph.D. in Biophysics from Wesleyan University and completed post-doctoral studies at Harvard Medical School. During career, published over 41 research papers.

Day One

Thursday 13th December 2018

8:20 am | Chair’s Opening Remarks

Day Two

Thursday 13th December 2018

2:00 pm | Panel Discussion: Targeting RNA with Small Molecules to Capture the Therapeutic Opportunities

8:55 am | Chair’s Opening Remarks

Samie R. Jaffrey
Co-Founder of Gotham Therapeutics; Professor of Pharmacology
Weill Cornell Medicine

Dr. Samie Jaffrey is the Greenberg-Starr Professor in the Department of Pharmacology at the Weill Cornell Medical College.  Dr. Jaffrey has fundamentally advanced our understanding of RNA biology and gene regulation.  His lab has developed genetically encoded fluorescent RNAs for imaging RNA localization and trafficking in live cells, including the Spinach-tagged RNAs, which can provide the same types of insights into RNA localization as GFP has provided for proteins. He also developed genetically encoded RNA-based metabolite sensors, which enable signaling and metabolic pathways to be imaged in living cells.  Most recently, he has helped to launch the field of “epitranscriptomics,” which relates to the diverse nucleotide modifications that impact the fate and function of mRNA and long noncoding RNAs in cells.  Dr. Jaffrey’s transcriptome-wide mapping of N6-methyladenosine (m6A) in 2012 revealed that m6A is a pervasive modification in the transcriptome, thereby identifying this modification as a fundamentally novel form post-transcriptional mRNA regulation. As a result of his early studies, epitranscriptomics is a rapidly developing area of molecular biology that is transforming our understanding of gene regulation in normal and disease states.

Day Two

Thursday 13th December 2018

9:00 am | Imaging and Assaying Selective Binding of Small Molecules Binding to RNA

Jennifer Petter
Founder & CSO
Arrakis Therapeutics

Dr. Petter is the Founder and CSO of Arrakis Therapeutics.  Previously she was Vice President of Chemistry at Celgene, Vice President of Drug Discovery at Avila Therapeutics, Vice President of Research at Mersana Therapeutics, Director of Small Molecule Drug Discovery at Biogen, Section Head in Oncology Chemistry at Sandoz/Novartis, and Assistant Professor of Chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh.  Dr. Petter graduated from Dartmouth College with an AB in chemistry, earned her PhD in organic chemistry at Duke University with Ned Porter, and was a post-doctoral fellow in Ron Breslow’s group at Columbia University.  She has ushered multiple compounds into the clinic for the treatment of cancer, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune disorders, and sepsis.

Day Two

Thursday 13th December 2018

2:00 pm | Panel Discussion: Targeting RNA with Small Molecules to Capture the Therapeutic Opportunities

11:30 am | Drugging RNA with Small Molecules

Richard Gregory
Co-Founder of Twentyeight- Seven Therapeutics; Professor
Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Richard I. Gregory. Ph.D. is Professor in the Departments of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, and Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, and Principal Investigator and endowed Chair in The Stem Cell Program in the Division of Hematology/Oncology at Boston Children’s Hospital. He is also co-Director and executive committee member of the Harvard Initiative for RNA Medicine, and Principal faculty member of The Harvard Stem Cell Institute. His innovative research has led to several breakthrough discoveries including the discovery that altered mRNA methylation is oncogenic since the RNA-modifying enzyme METTL3 is upregulated in most tumor types and enhances the expression certain oncogenes to promote cancer initiation. These pioneering studies provided major insight into the molecular mechanisms and role of mRNA methylation in gene regulation and helped establish the nascent ‘epitranscriptome’ and cancer field. He is committed to exploiting their basic knowledge of RNA regulation for the development of new and effective therapies and is a co-founder and scientific advisory board member of Twentyeight-Seven Therapeutics, a new biotechnology company that is developing new cancer drugs that target RNA pathways.

Day One

Thursday 13th December 2018

11:00 am | Emerging Role of RNA Methylation in Cancer

Kathryn McCabe
Senior Director of Business Development- Emerging Technology & Innovation
Eli Lilly

Kathryn (Katy) McCabe is Senior Director of Business Development- Emerging Technology and Innovation for Eli Lilly in Cambridge, MA.  Katy directly engages with the Cambridge innovation ecosystem with a focus on early discovery to help grow new therapeutics. She works with strategic limited partner Venture Capital firms to recommend and vet new companies, searches and evaluates in-licensing opportunities, connects directly companies in incubators such as Lab Central, and scouts new collaborations for Lilly R&D.  Prior to joining Lilly, Katy led technical and strategic assessments for partnerships, acquisitions, and company strategy across Gene Therapy, Immunology, Oncology, and Hematology at Baxalta.  At GlaxoSmithKline, Katy directed 3 high profile academic/industry collaborations at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute in neurodegeneration (now in PhII clinical trial), retinal disease, and muscle regeneration.  At Advanced Cell Technology (now Astellas), Katy was the Director of Preclinical Ocular Program where she managed a small team of senior scientists to generate stem cell derived products for the treatment of ocular diseases. Katy has a Ph.D. in Neuroscience and Behavior from the University of Washington and carried out her postdoctoral work at the California Institute of Technology.

Day Two

Thursday 13th December 2018

2:00 pm | Panel Discussion: Targeting RNA with Small Molecules to Capture the Therapeutic Opportunities

Yochi Slonim
Co-Founder & CEO
Anima Biotech

Yochi Slonim is a serial entrepreneur with a track record of over 30 years in software and biotech. As a co-founder and CEO, he is driving the company's vision and strategy, fundraising, and partnering. Prior to Anima, Yochi has built several companies from their early stage, through all stages of product development, marketing, and sales to eventual successful large exits. He was a co-founder of Mercury Interactive and served as CTO and VP R&D from the company's early days creating product vision, strategy and leading a multi-product organization. After going public and reaching revenues of over $1B annually, Mercury was acquired by HP for $4.5B. Yochi served as Senior VP of products and marketing for Tecnomatix, a public NASDAQ company, that generated revenues of $100m until the company was acquired by UGS for $230m. Yochi was also the founder and CEO of Identify, a company that reached revenues of $50m in less than 5 years and was acquired by BMC in 2006 for $150m in cash.

Day Two

Thursday 13th December 2018

2:00 pm | Panel Discussion: Targeting RNA with Small Molecules to Capture the Therapeutic Opportunities

11:00 am | Translation Control Therapeutics: Discovery of Small Molecule Drugs that Specifically Control mRNA Translation into Proteins

Margaret Porter Scott
VP, Biochemical & Cellular Pharmacology
Genentech

Dr. Scott joined Genentech because great science with great people is what she wants do. She has spent her career seeking the best ways to “reduce to practice” the key aspects of highly complex disease biology so that new drug discovery programs can be initiated and progressed. This leads to a tight partnership with Disease Biology and she counts herself so fortunate to have a role in Biochemical and Cellular Pharmacology focusing on the portfolio of cancer targets in partnership with the world-class Oncology Biology team at Genentech.

Frank Slack
Co-Founder of Twentyeight- Seven Therapeutics; Professor of Pathology
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Frank Slack, Ph.D. is Director of the Institute for RNA Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC). He is a Professor of Pathology. Frank Slack received his B.Sc. from the University of Cape Town in South Africa, before completing his Ph.D. in molecular biology at Tufts University School of Medicine. He started work on microRNAs as a postdoctoral fellow in Gary Ruvkun’s laboratory at Harvard Medical School, where he co-discovered the second known microRNA, let-7 and the first human microRNA. He subsequent moved to the Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology at Yale University, where he was a program leader in the Yale Cancer Center, and the Director of the Yale Center for RNA Science and Medicine. There he discovered that microRNAs regulate key human oncogenes and have the potential to act as therapeutics. He also demonstrated the first role for a microRNA in the aging process. In 2014 he became Director of the Institute for RNA Medicine and a Professor of Pathology at BIDMC.  Dr. Slack studies the roles and uses of microRNAs and their targets in development, disease and aging. He has been at the forefront of the small RNA revolution. He was in the team that discovered the first human microRNA, let-7 and subsequently showed that it is a tumor suppressor that controls key cancer genes, such as RAS, MYC and LIN28. They are developing let-7 and a second microRNA, miR-34 as novel cancer therapeutics (with miR-34 now independently in Phase I clinical trials). His group also proved that microRNAs act as key oncogenes and developed strategies to target these oncomiRs for cancer therapy. His research also extends to discovery of additional novel small RNAs in development, cancer, aging and diabetes as well as identifying novel SNPs in the non-coding portions of the genome with an eye to identifying the next generation of actionable targets in cancer. Dr. Slack was an Ellison Medical Foundation Senior Scholar, and received the Heath Award from MD Anderson in 2014.

Day One

Thursday 13th December 2018

9:00 am | MicroRNA-Based Therapeutics in Cancer

Razvan Nutiu
Senior Investigator
Novartis

Razvan Nutiu is an Investigator in the Department of Chemical Biology and Therapeutics, Novartis, Cambridge, USA, where he currently coordinates a research group focused on targeting modulating RNA biology with small molecules. At Novartis, Razvan has built expertise in integrated small molecule lead discovery, from target identification to assay development, high throughput screening, and identification of compound mechanism of action.

Day Two

Thursday 13th December 2018

1:30 pm | Modulation of RNA Biology with Small Molecules

Wesley Blackaby
VP, Chemistry
Storm Therapeutics

Wesley joined Storm Therapeutics as VP of Chemistry in March 2017 and is responsible for all chemistry-related activities. Wesley began his industrial career within process chemistry at Glaxo-Wellcome in Dartford before moving to Merck Sharpe and Dohme (MSD) in 1996. At MSD, Wesley worked on several programmes which reached clinical trials for schizophrenia and anxiety disorders. On leaving MSD in 2006 he joined BioFocus, part of the Galapagos group, advancing in project leadership roles culminating as Senior Director in Medicinal Chemistry, and was responsible for maintaining large multidisciplinary collaborations, overseeing the delivery of multiple drug discovery projects and pre-clinical candidates.  Wesley has extensive experience across a wide range of therapeutic areas and drug target classes in lead identification, lead optimisation and candidate nomination. Wesley completed his PhD studies under the joint supervision of Prof. Chris McGuigan (University College Cardiff) and Prof. George Attard (University of Southampton).

Day One

Thursday 13th December 2018

11:30 am | Drugging RNA Modifying Enzymes

Kevin Weeks
Founder of Ribometrix; Professor of Chemistry
University of North Carolina

Dr. Kevin Weeks is a Kenan Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  The vision of his laboratory is to use chemical principles to explore the central role of RNA in biology with a focus on real-world problems and understanding human disease.  RNA SHAPE and RING technologies, invented in his laboratory, are used worldwide.  The Weeks laboratory is applying SHAPE and other chemical technologies to challenging problems in biology, including the RNA-mediated reactions central to functions of mRNAs, lncRNAs, and viral RNAs.  Dr. Weeks is a Fulbright and a Searle Scholar, an NIH EUREKA awardee, a Fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science, and has taught many hundreds of undergraduates first year chemistry.

Day One

Thursday 13th December 2018

8:30 am | Structure-Based Discovery of New Functions in Large RNAs

Thomas Hermann
Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry; Associate Dean of Physical Sciences
University of California, San Diego

Thomas Hermann studied chemistry at the University of Ulm in Germany and performed graduate research at the Max-Planck Institute for Biochemistry in Martinsried. He received a Ph.D. in biochemistry from the Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich, and subsequently worked as a postdoc at the CNRS in Strasbourg, France, and at the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Dr. Hermann joined Anadys Pharmaceuticals in San Diego as one of the first employees of the biotechnology company. At Anadys, he built the structural chemistry group and led discovery teams working on ribosome-targeted antibiotics and HCV polymerase inhibitors, laying the foundation for the development of the experimental antiviral drug setrobuvir. Dr. Hermann eventually joined the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at UC San Diego where he currently is a Professor for Chemistry and Biochemistry, a founding director of the Center for Drug Discovery Innovation and the Associate Dean for Education and Students in the Division of Physical Sciences. Research in his laboratory is focused on exploring structured RNA as a drug target and a material for self-assembling nano-architectures.

Day One

Thursday 13th December 2018

4:30 pm | Exploration of Fragment Ligand Binding at a Viral Noncoding RNA Target

Martin Pettersson
Research Fellow
Pfizer

Martin Pettersson received his BS in chemistry from Indiana University, Bloomington in 1998 where he did undergraduate research in the laboratory of Professor David R. Williams. He then joined Pfizer as a medicinal chemistry research associate and contributed to projects in therapeutic areas such as inflammation, allergy & respiratory, and antibacterials. In 2002, he began his graduate studies at the University of Texas at Austin under the guidance of Professor Stephen F. Martin. After receiving his Ph.D. in 2007, he joined Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development as a medicinal chemist, and he is currently a Research Fellow in the Internal Medicine chemistry group in Cambridge, MA. At Pfizer he has made significant contributions as a medicinal chemistry team leader on various programs including Gamma Secretase Modulators and Apolipoprotein E. He is actively involved in phenotypic drug discovery including phenotypic screening hit triage, safety strategies, and de-convolution of mechanisms of action. Martin’s research interests also include targeting RNA using small molecules, and he organized a symposium on this topic at the New York Academy of Sciences. He is a co-author of 36 publications and patents/patent applications.

Day Two

Thursday 13th December 2018

12:00 pm | Identification of Small Molecules that Promote Exon 10 Skipping in MAPT Pre-mRNA

George A. Calin
Professor, Department of Experimental Therapeutics
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

George Adrian Calin received both his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees at Carol Davila University of Medicine in Bucharest, Romania. After working cytogenetics as undergraduate student with Dr. Dragos Stefanescu in Bucharest, he completed a cancer genomics training in Dr. Massimo Negrini’s laboratory at University of Ferrara, Italy. In 2000 he became a postdoctoral fellow at Kimmel Cancer Center in Philadelphia, PA, and while working in Dr. Carlo Croce laboratory Dr. Calin was the first to discover the link between microRNAs and human cancers, a finding considered as a milestone in microRNA research history. He is presently a Professor in Experimental Therapeutics and Leukemia Departments at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and studies the roles of microRNAs and other non-coding RNAs in cancer initiation and progression and in immune disorders, as well as the mechanisms of cancer predisposition linked to non-codingRNAs. Furthermore, he explores the roles of body fluids miRNAs as potential hormones and biomarkers, as well as new RNA therapeutic options for cancer patients. Simply, he is having fun making discoveries and publishing and, from time to time, getting funded grants.

Day One

Thursday 13th December 2018

2:00 pm | Targeting Non-Coding RNAs with Small Molecules: From Theory to Medical Practice

Johan Pontin
Founder & Former CEO
The RNA Medicines Company

Johan Pontin is the founder and former CEO of The RNA Medicines Company, a subsidiary of UCB. Johan Pontin and his co-founder Dalia Cohen has spent a focused effort since 2015 discovering small molecules inhibiting onco-miRs. Prior to The RNA Medicines Company Johan served as Founder and CEO of Beryllium Discovery, a rational drug discovery CRO acquired by UCB in 2017. Johan serves on both the Director’s board and the Business Advisory Board of the Harvard Initiative for RNA Medicine (HIRM). Johan is a Trustee at The Museum of Science (MOS).

Christopher Barbieri
Senior Investigator
Bristol-Myers Squibb

Christopher Barbieri is Biochemistry group leader for Lead Discovery and HTS at Bristol-Myers Squibb. Chris has been in the pharmaceutical industry for 7 years and been an integral part of lead identification and optimization for small molecule and protein therapeutics across multiple therapeutic areas including cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, neurodegeneration, immunology, oncology, and fibrosis. Chris’s doctoral research in Molecular Pharmacology with Professor Daniel Pilch at Rutgers University focused on RNA-targeting therapeutics and his postdoctoral research with Professor Ann M. Stock focused on dynamics of transcription factor-nucleic acid interactions. Subsequently, he has been able to apply his nucleic acid pharmacology and biochemistry background as part of the Merck team that discovered the Riboswitch-targeting antibacterial agent Ribocil, and his current RNA-targeted drug discovery efforts at BMS.

Day One

Thursday 13th December 2018

2:30 pm | Identifying Inhibitors of Dicer Processing of Specific Pre-miRNA Motifs

Day Two

Thursday 13th December 2018

2:00 pm | Panel Discussion: Targeting RNA with Small Molecules to Capture the Therapeutic Opportunities

Gerhard Mueller
CSO
Gotham Therapeutics

Gerhard Mueller is Chief Scientific Officer at Gotham Therapeutics, a transatlantic biotech company located in New York City, US, and Munich, Germany, focusing on epitranscriptomic drug discovery. Prior to his appointment at Gotham Therapeutics, he held several research management positions at biotech companies such as Axxima Pharmaceuticals, Munich, and GPC Biotech, Munich and Boston. Most recently, he built from scratch the Medicinal Chemistry business unit at Mercachem, a chemistry service provider in Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Before his career within the biotech industry, Gerhard held several senior research and project management positions within the pharmaceutical industry, i.e. at Glaxo Group Research in Verona, Italy, at Bayer AG, Leverkusen, Germany, and he headed the medicinal chemistry unit at Organon N.V. in Oss, NL. Gerhard obtained his PhD from the Technical University Munich, under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Horst Kessler establishing the research field of antiadhesive integrin antagonists. During his career, Gerhard has worked on several disease areas prosecuting different target families, among them protein kinases, proteases, GPCRs, integrins, protein-protein interaction targets and epigenetic enzymes and receptors. From this work, close to 10 clinical candidates emerged, and Gerhard is co-author of more than 75 scientific publications and numerous patents.

Day One

Thursday 13th December 2018

12:30 pm | Epitranscriptomic ‘m6A’ Target Space: When & Why to go Biophysical with Your Target

Ann Boriack-Sjodin
VP, Molecular Discovery
Accent Therapeutics

Ann Boriack-Sjodin joined Accent in October 2017 as Vice President of Molecular Discovery, bringing more than 20 years of drug discovery experience to the role.  She has spent her industrial career using structural biology, biochemical and biophysical methods to advance drug discovery programs in a variety of therapeutic areas.  Prior to joining Accent, she served as Senior Director, Lead Discovery at Epizyme, contributing to biochemical and structural characterization as well as the development of tool compounds for several protein methyltransferases. Ann has also worked at AstraZeneca, where she contributed to efforts in infectious disease and oncology, and Biogen Idec, where she contributed to both small molecule and biologic drug discovery programs. She is a member of the Penn Chemistry Scientific Advisory Committee for the University of Pennsylvania. Ann received a B.A. in chemistry from Harvey Mudd College, obtained her Ph.D. in biological chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania working with Dr. David Christianson and received postdoctoral training in the lab of Dr. John Kuriyan at The Rockefeller University.

Day One

Thursday 13th December 2018

12:00 pm | RMP-Targeted Cancer Drug Discovery

Christopher R. Trotta
VP, Biology
PTC Therapeutics

Dr. Trotta received his PhD in Biochemistry from the California Institute of Technology where he studied enzymes involved in tRNA splicing in the lab of Dr. John Abelson.  After a postdoctoral fellowship in the lab of Dr. James Dahlberg, where he studied tRNA and ribosome transport, he joined PTC Therapeutics, where as Vice President of Biology, he leads a team dedicated to the systematic discovery of small molecule therapeutics that target RNA biology.

Day One

Thursday 13th December 2018

3:00 pm | Targeting Pre-mRNA Splicing to Discover Novel Small Molecule Therapeutics

Pramod Pandey
Principal Scientist
Merck Research Labs Exploratory Science Center

Pramod Pandey is a Principal Scientist at the Merck, Exploratory Science Center in Cambridge, MA. Before joining Merck, Pramod was a Senior Investigator at the Novartis Institute for Biomedical Research. Pramod did his post-doctoral training at Dana Farber Cancer Institute where his research was focused on studying signalling mechanisms that regulate the responses to genotoxic stress. He has co-authored more than 55 articles published in high impact journals and is the co-inventor of two issued patents. Pramod has been engaged in small molecule drug discovery research for last 18 years. He has led efforts to develop and implement novel biochemical and cell-based approaches for the discovery and characterization of small molecules for various targets including RNA.

Day One

Thursday 13th December 2018

4:00 pm | Unlocking RNA Biology: Platform to Study RNA-Protein Interactions to Identify Novel Targets for Small Molecule Discovery

Gabriele Varani
Professor of Chemistry
University of Washington

Dr Varani has been working as a faculty on RNA structure, RNA-protein recognition and RNA-small molecule interactions since 1992, first as a senior tenured scientist at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, then as a Professor of Chemistry at the University of Washington. His group has determined the structures of many RNA-small molecule complexes and he has collaborated with Ciba-Geigy, SKB, Parke-Davis, Allelix and others to pursue small molecules targeting RNA. He was a co-founder of Ribotargets, in Cambridge, one of the first companies to target RNA pharmaceutically, in 1997. His interests are the discovery and development of small, drug-like (Lipinski) molecules that bind to coding and non-coding RNAs, and their optimization by structure-based drug design methods.

Day Two

Thursday 13th December 2018

9:30 am | Small Drug-Like Molecules Target Non-Coding RNA with nM Affinity

John Schneekloth
Senior Investigator
National Cancer Institute

Jay Schneekloth was recruited to the Chemical Biology Laboratory at the NCI in 2011, where he is currently a Senior Investigator. Since beginning his independent career, he has developed an internationally recognized research program focused on the identification and development of small molecules that modulate gene expression. Specific areas of focus in the lab include the identification and study of small molecules that bind to and perturb the function of DNA and RNA structures that are relevant to human disease. This work encompasses development of new assay technologies (including high throughput screening and biophysical assays), synthetic/medicinal chemistry, biochemistry of nucleic acids, and cell biological approaches.  A particular strength of the Schneekloth laboratory has been to use synthetic chemical approaches in concert with internally developed novel screening technologies to identify inhibitors of highly challenging, biologically valuable nucleic acid targets such as c-Myc and KRAS.

Day Two

Thursday 13th December 2018

10:00 am | Targeting Structurally and Functionally Diverse Nucleic Acids with Drug-Like Small Molecules

Julius B. Lucks
Associate Professor
Northwestern University

Julius B. Lucks is Associate Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Northwestern University. Research in the Lucks group combines both experiment and theory to ask fundamental questions about the design principles that govern how RNAs fold and function in living organisms, how these principles can be used to engineer biomolecular systems, and recently how they can open doors to new low-cost cell-free synthetic biology diagnostics. For his research, Professor Lucks has been recognized with a number of awards including a DARPA Young Faculty Award, an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship, an ONR Young Investigator Award, an NIH New Innovator Award, an NSF CAREER award, the ACS Synthetic Biology Young Investigator Award, and most recently a Camille-Dreyfus Teacher Scholar Award. He is a founding member of the Engineering Biology Research Consortium, and he co-founded the Cold Spring Harbor Synthetic Biology Summer Course. Please visit http://luckslab.org for more information.

Day One

Thursday 13th December 2018

9:30 am | Nascent RNA Structures: A Potential Gold Mine for Drug Targets

Pawel Sledz
Senior Scientist & Project Manager
University of Zurich

Dr Pawel Sledz is a Senior Scientist and Project Manager at University of Zurich (Zurich, Switzerland), where he is responsible for several FBDD/SBDD projects targeting protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions relevant in oncology. Since 2018 he is a holder of University Bioentrepreneur Fellowship. He completed his PhD studies at the University of Cambridge (2011), and held EMBO Long-term Postdoctoral Fellowship at Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry in Martinsried, Germany in 2012-2014.

Day One

Thursday 13th December 2018

5:00 pm | Structure- & Fragment-Based Development of Small Molecules Targeting RNA-Modifying Proteins & Protein-RNA Interactions Involved in Epitranscriptomic Regulation

John Moffat
Senior Scientist, Biochemical & Cellular Pharmacology
Genentech

John got his B.Sc.(hons) and PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Otago, New Zealand, studying ribosomal stop codon recognition. This was followed by postdoctoral fellowships at Washington University Medical School, St Louis MO, studying CSF1R signaling and breast cancer and UC Santa Cruz, where he worked on placental endocrinology, mammary gland biology and cancer. Prior to joining Genentech in 2003, he worked at Sugen characterizing functions of novel kinase drug targets. In his time at Genentech he has been part of many great small molecule project teams, including leading the Project Team for kinase inhibitor projects from hit-to-lead through to nomination of a clinical candidate. His current focus is on using chemical biology and informatics tools to understand the biological mechanisms of known inhibitors as well as to identify novel drug targets.